Garden fence

All gardeners like to chat, whether it is over the fence, across the driveway or between allotment patches.  This is the virtual version of that sort of chat and will talk about what has struck us recently, including the weather (we are English after all), what seems to be growing well (or badly) good (and bad) ideas that we have come across and anything else in the fruit and vegetable world that we think might interest other gardeners.

September 2017 – No Garden Tips

Our monthly tips are extended versions of the articles we write for the Cookham Parish Magazine.  In September we devoted the piece to promoting the village flower and produce show held in the middle of the month.  With almost 60 classes of vegetables, fruit, flowers and crafts and cooking, there is something for everyone, and with helpful organisers eager to assist new entrants, we wanted to encourage lots of entries.

The baking classes were, as usual, heavily subscribed and there seemed to be more entries in the vegetable classes than last year, but there were fewer flowers than last year.  One of the exhibitors said that the heavy rains in August and early September had meant that he had fewer blooms available than usual.  Nevertheless there were some lovely flower exhibits.

Top Vase Winner

Top Vase Winner

Flower displays

Flower displays

Amongst the vegetables, the chilli pepper class was popular, with a number of different cultivars entered.  On the fruit side, there were lots of lovely looking apples .

Chilli Peppers

Chilli Peppers

Apples

Apples

the heaviest pumpkin class attracted four entries with a winning weight of 37.2kg (or a whisper under 6 stone for those who prefer imperial measures).  this leads us to the second show of the month that we visited, the Malvern Autumn Show at the end of the month, which featured a giant vegetable show as well as more normal fruit and vegetable classes.

The Cookham pumpkins were just a little bit smaller than those in Malvern.  The winner at Malvern was over 400kg!

Cookham's Pumpkins

Cookham’s Pumpkins

Really Giant Pumpkins

Really Giant Pumpkins

Aside from the giant vegetables, there were lots of beautiful entries in the more standard classes.

A delicious assortment in a fantastic display

A delicious assortment in a fantastic display

The sheer number of entries shows the popularity of show growing, maybe next year’s Cookham show will fill the village hall even more fully.

All sorts of vegetables

All sorts of vegetables

Perfect leeks

Perfect leeks

The Village Show

Yesterday was the Cookham Village Show and for the first timer we entered some of the fruit and vegetable classes.  We grow for fun (and mostly to eat) but wanted to support the local show.  We found that the difficulty of getting the matching specimens needed for showing confirmed our view that we won’t be entering any of the bigger shows around.  We don’t really want to be digging up/harvesting more than we can eat or use at any one time simply to have the requisite number of matching carrots (or whatever).

We did have some successes, winning prizes for carrots, sweet peppers and a collection of three types of vegetable (in our case carrots again – albeit a different variety, parsnips and onions), but probably our best entry was the chilli peppers.  These were Joe’s Long, which are not only appropriately named but very prolific, so that we were able to get the required six matching peppers.

Prize Chilli Peppers

Prize Chilli Peppers

Chilli Plants

Chilli plants are one of the great givers.  A single plant can provide enough peppers for a year (unless you’re a real chilli head).  As well as being productive they can be very attractive and although they are often grown as tender annuals in the UK they are in fact perennials and can be over-wintered in frost free conditions.

This one is now just over 2 years old and has been brought indoors for the winter and looks sufficiently splendid that it will be incorporated into this year’s Christmas decorations.

Chilli 24 Nov 2015

Chilli 24 Nov 2015

Generally seed packets suggest that germination of chilli seeds requires extra heat (we generally use a small propagator), but this year we also noticed that quite a few plants had emerged from fallen fruit in one of the raised beds in the allotment.  We’ve potted up half a dozen of these and they are now being looked after on a windowsill to give us some specimen plants for next year.

Spring Flowers

One of the great things about gardening is that it is by nature optimistic and forward looking. Almost every job that we do is an investment in the future. In a country like Britain where there is a distinct rhythm to the seasons, this optimism is especially rewarding in spring. Spring bulbs are the confirmation that earlier work is bearing fruit and that longer, warmer days are on their way.

The “galanthophiles” will claim that snowdrops are the harbingers of the new year, but for Mark the sheer joyous colours of crocuses is the thing that shows that spring is really on the way.

Crocuses among leaf litter

Crocuses among leaf litter

Crocuses 11 March

Crocuses 11 March

A little later there is nothing like a classic daffodil to confirm that the worst of the winter is behind us.

Daffodils in the sun

Daffodils in the sun

A Hidden Gem

While at the Commonwealth Games in Glasgow we stumbled across a hidden gem thanks to a small note in a tourist map.  This was the rose garden in Tollcross Park https://glasgow.gov.uk/index.aspx?articleid=3743.

We were lucky to wander up on a quiet day and find the gardener undertaking the ongoing task of dead heading (over 4,000 plants make for a lot of dead heads).  He was kind enough to take a break and explain the history of the garden and the international trials conducted there.

Our attempted panoramic photograph doesn’t really do it justice, but if you’re ever up that way, drop in and wander round – it is truly spectacular.

Tollcross Park

Tollcross Park